Crazy: Android is coming to Intel processors

Crazy: Android is coming to Intel processors

Intel and Google jointly announced on Tuesday that future versions of Android will offer support for Intel’s Atom mobile processor family, meaning Android will finally make the jump from being ARM-exclusive, to also supporting x86.

The x86 instruction set has historically been used only in computers that run desktop operating systems, and the reduced instruction set ARM has been used in devices that run mobile operating systems.

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September 14, 2011

Hands-on with the WebStation Android Tablet

Hands-on with the WebStation Android Tablet

By Tim Conneally, Betanews

Camangi Webstation with Stylus

Expectations are a very dangerous thing indeed. As a user, if you expect a new device to do something — however unrealistic that expectation may be — you are bound to be disappointed when you find that it doesn’t.

With Internet tablets, it’s not really clear what users should expect when they pick one up for the first time. A couple of years ago, they were built on truncated versions of desktop operating systems, so users based their expectations on their desktop experience. Now, tablets are being built upon mobile operating systems, and expectations are shifting.

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April 15, 2010

Early build of Moblin 2.1 improves connectivity, but not device support


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By Tim Conneally, Betanews

Until recently, netbooks seemed to be computers designed by a subtractive process. That is, you start with a notebook design, and you scale back on the cost by equipping it with lower-power processors, less on-board storage, smaller screens, and either open source software or truncated desktop operating systems.

There really hasn’t been a powerful example of a “netbook experience” that was built from the ground up to differentiate the devices from their full-powered counterparts.

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November 6, 2009